Undergraduate

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Course Descriptions

HA1001 Introduction to International Relations and Foreign Policy
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU: 3
This subject provides students with the core concepts, processes, and issues of international relations. It examines the actors in international relations, how foreign policy is made, and the role of great powers. In addition, it deals with contemporary and future problems in the international system, including military conflict, demography, the trading system, and the environment. It will also review major schools of thought on the causes of international conflicts, and the means of resolving them.
HA1002 Introduction to Political Theory
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU:
This course examines major texts and thinkers in the Western history of political thought and the questions they raise about political order and authority. We will study many of the great texts of the Western tradition. These texts raise important questions about the nature of individual rights, the roots of government authority, the circumstances of legitimate revolution, the justification of religious tolerance, and the meaning of political ideals such as liberty, equality, and justice. We will study political thinkers like Plato, Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Marx, and Tocqueville. It considers the ways in which thinkers have responded to the particular political problems of their day, and the ways in which they contribute to a broader understanding about human goods and needs, justice, and democracy, and how they continue to shape, inform, and challenge the analysis of current political phenomena. The aim of this course is to understand the strengths and weaknesses of various thinkers and their philosophical approaches in order to gain a critical perspective on our own.
HA1003 Introduction to Public Administration and Policy
Pre Requisites
: Nil
AU: 3
This core course aims to develop your understanding of key concepts, principles and theoretical approaches of public administration and public policy that are essential for future social science-related courses and careers. Besides, it aims to develop your reflective capacity and enable you to link theory to practice through case studies and policy debates. You will also learn to write a critical research paper, with proper document and citations that would be useful for future social science-related courses.
HA1011 Politics of Singapore
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU: 3
This course will provide a broad overview of politics in Singapore. As a level 1000 module, it is designed to provide a basic understanding of the domestic politics of this city-state, the key determinants of Singapore’s politics, political institutions, political culture, citizen participation and nation-building, inter alia. The module essentially examines the structural aspects of Singapore’s political system. Students who are interested in understanding how politics in Singapore works should take this module. The module will also help students understand how public policy is formulated in Singapore, which will assist them in their careers in public service. Hopefully, after this module, you would be more interested in Singapore politics, and politics in general, such that you would read about it on your own.​
HA1012 Fundamentals of Politics
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU: 3​
This course introduces students to political science (including international relations, comparative politics, political theory, and public administration/public policy).
​​HU1002 Introduction to Urban Planning Major-PE/UE for PPGA students, UE for the rest of the students) 
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU: 3​
​​This course introduces you to Urban Planning as a process and practice that shapes the development of our urban life. As the world becomes increasingly urbanized and our ecosystem becomes more fragile, the need for proper management of urban land through sensible land use planning has become ever more critical. In this course, we will learn about the important processes that shape our urban past, present and futures, including urbanization and the historical development of cities. These processes form an epistemic context upon which the study of urban planning will be introduced. We will discuss about the relevance of urban planning as part of urban governance, including its scope of practice, the agencies and institutions involved in the planning process in different cities, and in Singapore. This course is envisioned to be the gateway course for students who are interested to explore urban planning as a possible career path, and more broadly for students who want to learn about the dynamics of the socio-spatial development of cities. A core pedagogic aim of HU1002 is the emphasis of how theories relate to practice. To this end, classroom discussions and assignments are crafted with this in mind and whenever possible, guest lectures by practitioners or field trips will be incorporated into the curriculum.
HA2003 Politics and Government in Southeast Asia
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
This course will provide a broad survey of the domestic politics of the Southeast Asian region. Nations studied will include Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Thailand, and Vietnam. It will also examine the important factors that shape the political landscape of Southeast Asia, paying particular attention to the historical conditions (colonialism, modernity, nationalism, war etc) which gave rise to the construction of Southeast Asia as a geo-political entity.
HA2004 Theories in International Relations
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
The course offers major theoretical and empirical frameworks in international relations to discuss causal mechanisms of various past/current events in the world. Students who are interested in international relations or social science in general are encouraged to take this course. It also provides solid foundations to cultivate your social scientific perspective to grasp future dynamics of international relations.
HA2005 Contemporary Political Theory
Pre Requisites: HA1002
AU: 3
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to certain of the most important contributions to political theory made in the 20th century. Although the texts studied will be presented chronologically, we will consider them from a general thematic standpoint that interrogates the philosophical acumen of what has come to be established as the dominant political framework of our time: liberalism. We thus begin with John Dewey’s radical reformulation of the liberal political tradition, in which he attempts to respond to what earlier critics of liberalism identified as its fundamentally ahistorical presuppositions, particularly its methodological individualism. After familiarizing ourselves with Dewey’s reconstruction of the liberal political tradition we will study a variety of thinkers who continue to question the legitimacy of the liberal understanding of the nature of the individual and political society. Figures studied will include: the conservative German jurist and eventual Nazi apologist, Carl Schmitt; the pioneering psychoanalyst, Sigmund Freud; the neo-Marxist Frankfurt School members, Theodor Adorno and Max Horkheimer; the arguably unclassifiable thinker of the specificity of the political, Hannah Arendt; the revolutionary post-colonial thinker, Frantz Fanon; and the French post-structuralist historian and philosopher, Michel Foucault. Finally, we will conclude the course by returning to the liberal tradition and examining two important essays by John Rawls – the most important liberal philosopher since John Stuart Mill, and arguably the most influential political theorist of the 20th century – paying particular attention to Rawls’ attempt to theorize a political liberalism sensitive to the fact of human difference. Throughout the course of the semester students will be encouraged to put each of the thinkers into dialogue with one another, interrogating the ways in which the construction of specific theoretical constellations is able to reveal to us potential textual gaps and inconsistencies, but also new perspectives on how we think about political reality that might otherwise remain obscured. Students will also be required to continually put the texts studied to work, that is, utilize them in order to attempt to shed critical light on their own political worlds and how they think about the nature of human existence and interaction.
HA2009 The Making of E-government
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 3
This subject focuses on the following issues: network and national information policy; principal theories of e-governance; the analysis of e-government in Singapore; information technological policy and egovernment of China; and the practice of e-government in other countries. As governmental institutions apply new technological advances in communication and policy development, the evolution of e-government spells important changes in how they operate and relate to constituents. Using technology effectively and ethically is a new and important challenge to democratic institutions.
HA2011 Cost-benefit Analysis in Public Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 3
This module introduces the application of the techniques of cost-benefit analysis to evaluate a  variety of programs. Both theoretical foundations and applications of these techniques in  economic appraisal will be presented. These techniques are critical for researchers and policy  makers in many sectors. You are expected to have some knowledge on microeconomics, statistics and geometry​.
HA2014 Public Organization and Management
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 3
This subject introduces organisation theory and behaviour in public organisations. Topics include organisational environment, goals and effectiveness, strategic planning, power and decision-making, culture and value, structure and control, leadership, motivation, and communication. It also analyses the strategies of organisational change and development that make public organisations more efficient, effective, responsive, accountable, and innovative in complex and dynamic environments to meet the challenges confronting government today.
HA2015 China in Africa
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU: 3
This course provides the students with a comprehensive understanding of China-Africa contemporary relations and of the main debates in the field in the framework of International relations and Foreign policy analysis theory. It unpacks the foundations of China’s foreign policy towards Africa, the main features of relations, the achievements and challenges and how it impacts the continent’s development and its international relations.
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HA2017 Foreign Policy Analysis
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
The course is divided in two parts. The first part provides and historical background and overview of foreign policy analysis theoretical perspectives (realism, liberalism and constructivism) and how it relates to International Relations. The second part focuses on the various factors and components that influence and shape decision making in foreign policy, namely actors, structures, media and public opinion, various models, implementation strategies and instruments, economic statecraft, national security and transnational issues considerations.
HA2020 Socio-Political Analysis in Public Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1003 & HA1012
AU: 3 
​This subject provides an introductory overview of the field of Public Policy. It examines the evolution of Public Policy as a discipline and presents the institutions and processes, as well as the political, economic, cultural, and bureaucratic contexts, in which government makes public policies. It also introduces various theoretical models – for example, institutionalism, elitism, public choice, game theory, and interest group conflict – in the analysis of public policy. It further provides a general overview of techniques in policy analysis and evaluation as well as substantive policy areas such as education, environment, energy, social welfare, and so forth.
HA2023 Research Methodology in Social Sciences (recoded from HA3002)
Pre Requisites:  HA1003 & HA1012
AU: 3
This subject introduces basic research methods in generating accurate and useful information for social science research. Topics include the theoretical foundation of social research, various techniques for research design, the conceptualization and definition of social and policy problems, the methods of data collection including sampling, interviewing, survey questionnaire, analysis and organisation of both qualitative and quantitative data (including descriptive and regression analysis), and the interpretation and presentation of research results.
Pre Requisites:  HA1003
AU: 3​
This course basically aims to advance the understanding of your analytical methods by training them in the basic concepts of descriptive and inferential statistics and by using those concepts through a hands-on approach. As a modern administrator, an insightful policy analyst or a good researcher, you must learn to become an intelligent consumer and producer of empirical research as applied to public administration and policy. Based on data-based exercises and practices, this course will help you understand quantitative journal articles that use statistics as a written language for communication.
HA2026 American Foreign Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1012
AU: 3
This course is designed to help develop your capacity both to explain the foreign policy-making process in the United States, and to better understand the underlying patterns, logic, and implications of American foreign policy in the world at large. Anyone interested in international relations, American history and politics and policy processes would benefit from this class. If you are considering a career in diplomacy or the military, this course will serve as a practicum to help you prepare for your future.
HU2002 Urban Life, Design and Policy (Major-PE/UE for PPGA students, UE for the rest of the students) 
Pre Requisites: Nil 
AU: 3
This course introduces you to the foundations of the development of cities and the role that urban planning plays in shaping the life of cities. In this course, we will read and discuss classical scholarship pieces on these topics in the context of how urban life relates to urban planning. A secondary dimension of the course is learning about the comparative lens in urban research, particularly as it pertains to comparing the experience of urban development in Western cities and the cities in Asia. Lastly, the course seeks to introduce you to the theory-practice nexus of urban planning as a discipline by interleaving discussions of theory with guest lectures about the professional practice of planning.  
HA3004 United States and East Asia
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
The subject introduces and analyzes the international relations between the United States and East Asia. The United States remains the only superpower in the world today and East Asia is one of the most dynamic and consequential regions in world politics. Their interactions are of major consequences to the conduct of world diplomacy and the developments of their foreign policies pose mutual challenges to each other. Topics will include: United States and China, the US -Japan Alliance, US-Korea relations, and USASEAN relations.
HA3005 Politics of the Developing World
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
This course aims to familiarise you with major historical and contemporary issues impacting politics in developing countries and equip you with a theoretically informed understanding of multiple development challenges they face.  
The course is designed for students who are interested in development issues but have no substantial background on the discipline.  
By introducing you to development studies, HA3005 is a first step for those of you who are considering a future career in national aid agencies, multilateral development agencies (UNDP,UNICEF, UNESCO, FAO,WB, IMF, AIIB ... ), development related NGOs (OXFAM, Al, HRW ... ) or becoming social entrepreneurs.
HA3007 Public Budgeting And Financial Management
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 3
This subject introduces the institutional, political, and administrative aspects of government budgets and the budgeting process, including revenue and expenditure patterns. It also discusses taxation, public borrowing and debt administration, capital budgeting and urban development, and intergovernmental fiscal relationships. In addition, it explores the basic concepts and principles of government accounting and auditing as part of the comprehensive control system of government.
HA3010 Mass Media and Public Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 3
This course explores the relationship between the mass media and public policy with a focus on the Singapore media systems and politics. It discusses the role of mass media in politics and public policy making, introduces the organization and operation of contemporary mass media, and investigates the effects of public policies on the mass media with a special focus on the media regulation policy of media structures and programming, especially in Singapore​.
HA3014 Singapore’s Foreign Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1011
AU: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide students with a foundational understanding of diplomacy and foreign policy, with a specific focus on Singapore. We will also examine Singapore’s relations with its neighbors in the region. HA3014 is targeted towards students who are interested to learn about Singapore’s foreign policy. This course will focus on both the theory and practice of foreign policy and it meant to help students better appreciate decision-making and foreign policy formulation in the Singaporean context.
HA3015 Media and Politics
Pre Requisites: HA1012
AU: 3
​This module examines cases in various countries in the West and the East to provide students with an understanding of the relationship between the mass media and politics in contemporary society. This module seeks to equip students with a basic understanding of the complex and dynamic relationships between the government, politicians and the media. At the end of the course, students would have gained an insight into and be able to appreciate these subtle relationships, an understanding of newsroom operations and the various ways through which news are presented to the public.
HA3016 China’s Foreign Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1012
AU: 3
​This course aims to introduce students to contemporary China foreign Policy. It will acquaint students with the various domestic and international drivers and players that have shape China's foreign policy since the end of the Cold War; familiarise them with China's FP bilateral and multilateral engagements with key powers and regions; and help students identify and explain major trends and challenges facing China's foreign Policy as it rises to great power status. The course is designed for students who are interested in gaining a more structured understanding of China's foreign Policy and its growing impact in international affairs. By providing you with a comprehensive understanding of the main foreign policy vectors of a key regional and global power, HA3016 is an important asset for those of you who are considering a future career as a diplomat or in foreign affairs in general, here in the region or globally​.
HA3018 Borderless Migration?
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1002
AU: 3
The explosion in the movement of people in recent decades has transformed traditionally sending countries into receiving states. While many people will continue to cross national and regional borders at unprecedented speed, governments around the world and their citizens are still adjusting to these very rapid changes and learning how to address their effects through public policy. By focusing on the political, economic, social and security determinants of refugee and migration flows, students in this course will analyse the causes and consequences of modern population movement. The course is structured according to different migration groups (talent; family members; asylum seekers; refugees; irregular and undocumented migrants; victims of trafficking and smuggling) and students will learn about how and why certain migrant groups are ‘included’ while others are ‘excluded’ from entry and access to citizenship.
HA3019 East Asian Security - Past, Present, and Future
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA2004
AU: 3
This course provides the student in-depth knowledge about the security development in East Asia from the post-World War II period as well as theoretical perspectives to capture the main components of East Asian Security mechanism. We will discuss the concept of “East Asia” and “International Security; history of East Asian security; US “hub-and-spoke” system, particularly the US-Japan alliance; ASEAN multilateralism, particularly ASEAN Regional Forum, ASEAN Defense Ministers Meeting, and East Asia Summit; advanced theoretical frameworks to make sense of East Asian security; and regional security issues, such as the Rise of China, the Korean Peninsula, the Taiwan Straits, East and South China Sea. In order to foster discussions in the class, students need to catch up with contemporary East Asian affairs, through Newspaper, Magazines, and on-line media. By the end of this class, students would have a more nuanced understanding of security threats in East Asia and be able to use international relations theory to explain why certain issues become threats and how political actors have sought to resolve them. ​
HA3020 Justice
Pre Requisites: HA1002 (prev - HA1002 & at least one 2000-level PPGA course)
AU: 3
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to certain of the most important debates regarding the concept of justice in contemporary political thought.  It will unfold specifically through a consideration of John Rawls’ seminal 1971 text A Theory of Justice, and various of Rawls’ most important philosophical critics.  After examining Rawls’ account of justice as fairness, we will examine four texts which critique Rawls from distinct theoretical orientations. Specifically, we will look at a libertarian critique (Robert Nozick), a communitarian critique (Michael Walzer), a feminist critique (Susan Moller Okin), and a realist critique (Raymond Geuss).
HA3021 Comparative Politics in Asia
Pre Requisites: HA1002 & HA1012 
​The course will enable students to analyse different interpretations of political development in Asia; understand the role of the US in shaping Asia into a hegemonic order; grasp the basic features of the Japanese model of the developmental state and its influence in East Asia; understand the key features of China’s political reform and its rising economic and strategic influence; to evaluate the fragile political development of Southeast Asian states; understand the fundamental effects of the 1997 financial crisis in Asia; and evaluate the character and prospects of Asian regionalism at economic, political and security levels.
HA3022 The Origins of Modern Political Thought
Pre Requisites: HA1002​
This course will examine several key texts of early modern political thought. We will investigate how these texts laid the foundation for the development of a variety of modern concepts and ideas that continue to inform our understanding of political life and reality today. Through reading the work of theorists such as Niccolo Machiavelli, Martin Luther, John Calvin, Thomas More, Jean Bodin, and Etienne de La Boetie, we will engage a variety of important contemporary issues, including the relation between the theological and the political, the political function of "utopian thought, thenatureof sovereignty, political realism,and voluntary servitude.
HA3023 International Security
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
This course surveys current issues in international security. We will cover several of the most pressing issues in contemporary national security, ranging from traditional security issues like inter-state and civil war, nuclear proliferation, and the rise of great powers to more non-traditional, newer issues like terrorism, climate change, and “human security.” The course will also examine some of the solutions that have been proposed for these security problems, including international organizations, democracy promotion, and military intervention.
HA3024 China’s Re-emergence in World Politics
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
The purpose of this course is to provide students with an understanding China’s rise in world politics and an appreciation of its international affairs. The course prepares students to take a critical view on one of the most systemic shift of our time – the emergence of China as the world’s largest economy and as a major power in the world. This course will investigate events, contexts and cases that have shaped China’s foreign policy, diplomatic engagements, militarization, and economy.
HA3025 The Politics and Practice of International Diplomacy
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
Diplomacy has been described as the ‘engine room’ of international politics and typically involves the practice of managing a country’s international affairs vis-à-vis other international actors. This course equips students with an understanding of the politics and practices of international diplomacy. It will examine the historical evolution of diplomacy and the contemporaneous practices of international diplomacy across a range of issues through state and non-state actors.
​​HA3026 Crisis Leadership and Management
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 3
​This course aims to develop your understanding of key concepts, principles and theories of crisis leadership and management that are essential for facilitating crisis resolution. Crises can take many forms without warning. Being able to recognize and manage crises effectively can greatly reduce the amount of damage an individual or an organization receives, avoid recovery delays, build resilience and promote sustainability. This course is for students who want to develop and strengthen their crisis leadership and management capabilities.
HA3027 Comparative Regional Security Institutions - From Asia to Africa
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 3
Power is the defining feature of international politics and security. As such, international relations scholars focus on great power-led regional institutions, such as the European Union (EU) and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), for their research, because those institutions possess “power” in shaping international politics. However, there are so many other regional political/security institutions in the world, which begs an important question: what kind of power do regional security institutions that are not led by great powers have? This seminar aims to understand material and non-material power of non-great power-led regional institutions possess in shaping international and regional politics. To this end, the seminar offers you the in-depth knowledge of non-great power-led regional security institutions in the world, ranging from Asia to the Middle East to Latin America to South America. More specifically, the seminar explores their institutional history, objectives, and functions, exploring the applicability of the existing theoretical frameworks in the IR field. This seminar is geared toward those who are interested in secondary powers in international politics and security institutions.
HA3032 Urban Politics and Policy-making (Major-PE/UE for PPGA students, UE for the rest of the students)
Pre Requisites: None
AU: 3
Urbanization continues apace into the 21st Century worldwide, centering cities and metropolitan regions as critical units of politics and policy-making in issues including immigration, housing and climate change. As large, dense and diverse human habitats, urban politics and policy-making are influenced by the dynamic triadic relationship among society, economy and land. In cities, land use allocation and production of space interact with the needs of diverse populations, capital and municipal institutions to generate contested spatial claims among multiple stakeholders. The size of its diversity and concentration of diversity also make cities places of subcultures, varied institutions and fragmented interests. As gateways for new ideas and adoption of new cultures, cities are also sites of dynamic social and spatial change that function as multi-scalar hubs of interconnections among the neighborhood, city, metropolitan and national levels.    
By 2030, Asia will emerge as the region with the most cities and with more big cities than anywhere else in the world, according to United Nations (2018). It should be expected that the “local turn” in politics and policy-making experienced in American and European cities over the last two decades will continue, and Asian cities will follow suit, albeit differently due to their different political regimes.  

 
The course aims are twofold: 
Firstly, the course offers knowledge about the particularities of the urban environment for politics about space/place and policy-making, and an ongoing tension between people-based and place-based policies. This course draws upon multi-disciplinary knowledge in urban planning, sociology, geography, public policy and public administration to inform our understanding of urban politics and policy-making – essentially interdisciplinary areas of knowledge creation.  

 
Secondly, the course seeks to equip you with a set of skills to research and analyze questions related to policies that govern the functions, problems and life of a city. During the course, you should expect to engage in using comparative lens to examine problems common in the urban realm in cities outside Singapore, in order to inform creative policy recommendations that are applicable to the problems facing Singapore as a city-state​.
HA4001 ASEAN in the 21st Century
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 4
​The course will examine the development of Association of Southeast Asia Nations (ASEAN) over the past three decades. It will also analyze the post Cold War period of ASEAN’s development, identifying a broadening and widening of ASEAN’s role and function in terms of both security and economics. The issue of the expansion of ASEAN’s membership to include Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Myanmar as well as the organization’s relationship with other Asia-Pacific security and economic structures will be also treated in depth. It will also probe the initial efforts to promote regional economic integration in ASEAN.
HA4006 Public Leadership (previously known as Special Topic in Public Administration)
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 4
This course focuses on leadership in the public sector. It is meant for those of you who are interested in leadership and/or plan for a career in the public sector. The sustainability and success of public service agencies and the country depends on the development of effective leaders. To increase the supply of future leaders for the public service, we need a deep understanding of how leader development happens and how leaders operate. This course provides you with a good understanding of leadership theories and skills in the public sector, particularly in the Singapore context. At the end of the course, you will understand the main philosophy, various theories, models and new developments of public leadership, and master some critical leadership skills.
HA4011 Public Administration - Past, Present and Future
Pre Requisites: HA1003 & HA1004
AU: 4​
What is public administration? How is it different from political science? Is there any intersection between public administration and public policy? Isn’t managing public service workers the same as managing business sector employees? If so, why don’t we just study business management? All these questions lead scholars to claim that public administration nowadays face “identity crisis.” Many people, especially students, do not really know why we need to study public administration and what is unique in this discipline. This course is designed to answer the aforementioned questions.
HA4013 Advanced Topics in Democratic Theory - Democracy and Division
Pre Requisites: HA1002
AU: 4
This course will provide students with a theoretical interrogation of the concept of democracy, particularly as it relates to the issue of social division. Throughout the history of political thought, theorists from Plato to John Rawls have recognized that division is the essence of the sphere of politics: divisions continually emerge between different parts of the political community, between those who claim different titles to govern, those with differing desires and needs, those with opposing visions of the common good, and so on. With few exceptions, however, the tradition’s canonical thinkers have seen this plurality as a condition that needs to be overcome, not as one to be affirmed. In this course we will study a variety of twentieth-century political theorists who have not only recognized the fact of human difference, but who argue that the realization of democracy depends upon precisely the affirmation of this difference.  Democracy is thus essentially related to the effort to give an expression to the multiplicity of social forms of doing, being, and thinking that internally differentiate all political societies. Students will be encouraged to contrast this understanding of democracy with those contemporary ones that emphasize the values of social harmony and consensus, providing them with a ground to critically probe actually existing political institutions and orders.
HA4014 European Union
Pre Requisites: HA1002
AU: 4
This course introduces the politics and policies of European integration. The European Union (EU), one of the most established international regional organisations in the world, has been an institution in the making for 60 years. The policies adopted at the supranational level now affect more than 500 million citizens of 28 countries; the bilateral and multilateral relationships that EU member states form are subject to the scrutiny of central institutions such as the European Commission, European Parliament, and the European Court of Justice, among others. By taking this course, you will learn about the historical motivations that led to the emergence of the European Union (and which alternative models were considered), the design and structure of European institutions (and how they have evolved over time), the core policy areas regulated at the EU level (and why some are outside the formal EU institutional framework), as well as theories that attempt to capture these complex and multilevel interactions.
HA4017 Economic Issues for Public Decision Making
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 4
This course introduces students to an in-depth examination of the forces that influence the behavior of public administrators engaged in the public sector decision-making process on economic issues. Based on diverse theoretical and practical perspectives, students are able to learn various market and bureaucratic scenarios including micro- and macro-economic problems and impacts and how tools of modern political economy can be used to address contemporary policy questions. By leading classes along with discussions, students are encouraged to marshal facts embedded in the public decision making, analyze research literature, critically examine the pros and cons, and support educated conclusion as potentially qualified public administrators and policymakers
​​HA4018 Policy Evaluation
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 4
Policy/program evaluation constitutes a key element of contemporary policymaking and refers to a comprehensive, often multi-year study of program/policy function and outcomes. This course will expose students to: 1) the complexity and scope of policy evaluation; and 2) the basic methods of policy and program evaluation. The social, political, and ethical contexts of evaluation will also be covered in the class.
Throughout the semester, we will look at evaluation examples that have been conducted on public issues, programs, and policies to demonstrate key points. We will also work through the application of fundamental evaluation concepts and techniques, and at the same time address a range of measurement issues, the basics of analysis, and reporting of performance data. Students will be exposed to a number of evaluation studies and will have hands-on experience of designing evaluation projects.
HA4019 Methods in Political Theory
Pre Requisites: HA1002
AU: 4
Within the field of political theory, questions regarding method tend to be obscured or ignored by practitioners and students alike. This course will aim to correct this lack through introducing students to the most significant methodological approaches to the practice of political theory. We will examine both the theoretical assumptions guiding the various methods, as well as how the methods are concretely applied in the formulation and analysis of political thought. Examples of methodological traditions that will be studied include: analytic political philosophy, realism, esotericism, contextualism, dialectical analysis, standpoint theory, genealogy, deconstruction, and comparative political theory.
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 4
The aims of the module are to develop knowledge and understanding of the nature of international politics in the Asia-Pacific, the conceptual and theoretical issues relating to those politics, equip students with basic skills to analyze foreign policy of major powers and explain the role of regional institutions and small states, and enhance communication skills.
Pre Requisites: HA1003​ & HA2023
AU: 4
​Qualitative research is an essential tool for deeper probing of diverse social phenomena and for designing effective public management strategies and policies. In the public administration and policy areas, narratives, case studies, observations, and more recently, focus groups have contributed insight and depth to our understanding of the structural, managerial, and environmental factors embedded in the public sector. Given this, you, as an independent researcher, need to understand the philosophy of qualitative, non-statistical social science research, focusing on how to design methods of qualitative research and how to conduct the analysis. The main objective of this course is not only to empower you to critically consume research through various forms of qualitative methods, but also to provide the fundamental skills for their own future rigorous research work (e.g., final year project). More specifically, while studying different qualitative inquiry approaches, you will be able to create a rationale for a qualitative inquiry that will be applicable to their research (or a hypothetical one) and to conduct qualitative research with data production (e.g., interviews, case studies, and observations). Lastly, you will be able to analyze and interpret their data using content or another discourse analytic technique​.
HA4026 Selected Topics in Health Care and Ageing
Pre Requisites: HA1003​
AU: 4
​This core course aims to develop your understanding of key concepts, principles and theories of health care and ageing that are essential for health-related policy analysis and pursuing careers in the health care field. In addition, it aims to develop your reflective capacity and enable them to link theory to practice through examining case studies in different countries.
HA4028 Global Perspectives on Politics and Policy
Pre Requisites: HA1001, HA1002, HA1003, HA1011 & HA1012
AU: 2
​The course aims to convey knowledge about the implications of new media and the internet within different subfields of political science and communication with insights into the theoretical points of departure for this development, as well as implications, with reference to various empirical studies of the transformation of politics and media online. More specifically the course aims at exploring the complex relationship between new ICTs (information and communication technologies), globalization, and a multitude of issues ranging from citizen participation to democratic deliberation, minority rights, and food politics.
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 4
The course offers major empirical frameworks to study causal mechanisms of international political phenomena. Students who are interested in empirical methods in international relations or political science in general are encouraged to take this course. It also provides solid foundations for your social scientific understanding of international relations/political science.
HA4030 Interstate Conflict
Pre Requisites: HA1001
AU: 4
​The course offers major theoretical and empirical frameworks to study causal mechanisms of interstate conflict.
Students who are interested in international conflict are encouraged to take this course. It also provides solid foundations to cultivate your social scientific perspective to grasp future dynamics of interstate conflict.​
HA4031 ​Human Capital Management in the Government
Pre Requisites: HA1001, HA1002, HA1003, HA1011, HA1012
AU: 4
This course aims to introduce students to the theoretical and practical foundations of human capital management in the government context. The course is designed to develop understanding of different organisational behaviour and human resource management perspectives on managing people in the public sector. The course will introduce students to major differences in the public and private sector perspectives on environment, environment-organization interface, and organizational goals and structures, using an international comparison approach. This course will be useful to any students who are interested in learning how to approach people management in the government context.
HA4032 ​What is a CIty? (Major-PE/UE for PPGA students, UE for the rest of the students)
Pre Requisites: HU1002 or HU202
AU: 4

​Cities are growing in size and in presence! Literature about cities and urbanism proliferates as new fads of urbanism ebb and flow. With the deluge of information about the woes and potentialities of cities for human futures, this course aims to engage students to reflect upon the concept, purpose and the nuts and bolts of a city as a human environment. What is a city? What is a good city? How does a good city look like? As such, the course content is deliberately multi-disciplinary drawing from writings on cities by philosophers, sociologists, geographers, political scientists, planners and architects. Whenever available and appropriate, policy reports from international organizations like the United Nations will be included in topical discussions of issues of contemporary salience (e.g. inequality, diversity, justice) throughout the semester to make explicit the nexus between theory and practice that lies at the crux of most urban research.  This course is for students who are keen to further engage in a critical inquiry of cities and discussing about what a good city is, beyond the basic content offered in HU 1002: Introduction to Urban Planning and HU 2002: Urban Life and Urban Planning. The course is crafted with the aim to allow students to co-produce and co-own the course content that they find valuable in informing their interests about the subject matter, and their graduation research projects.

HA4033 ​Political Theory and Psychoanalysis
Pre Requisites: HA1002
AU: 4
In this course you will examine a selection of some of the most influential contributions to the study of the intersection of psychoanalytic and political theory. Mostly eschewing Sigmund Freud’s own political analyses, we begin with an investigation of some of the most notable articulations of his metapsychology, or the philosophy of the psychical apparatus. The psychoanalytic starting-point is the recognition of an unconscious, an inner subjective life that fundamentally structures our specifically human existence in indeterminate ways. This recognition poses fundamental challenges to various established models of political reason. It can no longer be taken for granted, for example, that political determinations may be potentially grounded in transparent and rational processes of reflection and deliberation that are capable of fully revealing to us our collective interests and goods. Rather, political theory must recognize the unconscious desires, emotions, affects, and motives that subterraneously influence our outward behaviours and orientations. Through the study of various 20th century clinical analysts as well as social theorists influenced by psychoanalysis – such as Wilhelm Reich, Herbert Marcuse, Norman O. Brown, Cornelius Castoriadis, Franz Fanon, and Jessica Benjamin –  we will investigate various important political issues complicated by the Freudian discovery of the unconscious, including the psychology of fascism, the desire for voluntary servitude, the nature of autonomy, the ground of gender hierarchy, and many more. After having completed the course you will have gained a deeper appreciation of the psychological factors and motivations which influence the decision-making of political actors.
HA4034 Causal Inference In Policy Evaluation
Pre Requisites: HA1003
AU: 4
​You will learn various empirical methods for policy evaluation to measure the causal effects of policies. This include regression, matching based on observables, difference-in-difference, instrumental variable, regression discontinuity design. You will work with real world data and replicate policy evaluations using these methods using STATA (statistical software). Finally, you will also learn how to conduct spatial analysis, learning how to collect and extract data across space, and create maps.
 
This course will prepare you how to manage data, conduct statistical analysis, interpret results and present research findings in a rigorous manner. This course will also be useful for equipping you with relevant skillsets for their final year project.
HA4035 ​Food Politics and Policies
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1012
AU: 4
This course will introduce you to the politics and policies of food in several countries, international organisations, and across time. Food is fundamentally essential to our physical existence, but it is also intensely cultural, with socially constructed behaviour and preferences that are change-resistant even in the presence of new knowledge, policies, and practices. How have different historical, social, economic, political, and institutional factors contributed to shaping national and international food policy outcomes? In this course, we begin with a heuristic analytical framework that enables you to study how interests, ideas, instruments, and institutions interact and affect the formation, development, and implementation of national and international food policy decisions. This course is organised around four themes: politics of food identity; globalisation or glocalisation; politics of food scandals; and international politics of food. By taking this course, you will learn how food is a powerful lens to understand contemporary politics and policies beyond consumption and nutrition.
​​HA4036 Power in International Relations: Order and Transition
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA2004
AU: 4
“Power” is the most important, defining concept in international politics. Nevertheless, it has yet to be consensual definitions among scholars. This seminar aims to offer students the in-depth, comprehensive knowledge of the concept of “power”. Through class discussions, students will learn the historiography of the concept, the debates over the concept in the International Relations field, the subfield of power (e.g. material and ideational power), and its operationalization and measurements. Applying these conceptual frameworks, you will analyze how the ongoing and past power transitions have shaped international politics. This course is more relevant for those who are interested in graduate studies in International Relations.
HA4038 Critical International Theory
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1002
AU: 4
The course introduces a diverse set of theories and concepts that critiques and criticizes traditional IR theories. We will intervene in existing IR debates, from these critical perspectives, while introducing cutting-edge research that pushes the disciplinary boundaries of international relations.
HA4039 ​Knowledge Politics
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1002
AU: 4
This course will introduce you to the politics of knowledge through the analytical lenses of international relations and public policy. Higher education is often considered the next frontier in the knowledge economy race to attract, train, and retain talent. At the same time, it is central to the cultivation of national identity, sensitivity, and future. In this course, we take as a point of departure that higher education straddles several key societal pillars that have difficult-to-reconcile objectives: culture (higher education as inculcating students with a sense of civic responsibility), market (higher education as training the next generation of entrepreneurs and innovators; higher education as a form of exportable services), and politics (knowledge collaboration and exchange as a form of diplomacy; knowledge generated from the higher education sector as policy solutions for meeting the world’s Grand Challenges). By taking this course, you will learn that the ways in which higher education is configured and reconfigured thus constitutes a window into the overall social, economic, and political stability of a state and region, as well as their likely future trajectories.
HA4064 Model United Nations
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA2004
AU: 4
This course simulates the work of the United Nations Security Council using a series of crisis simulations. Through the “representation” of a country in simulations of the UN Security Council, you will develop skills in public speaking, research, and negotiation. In each simulation, you will research your country’s position on a crisis facing the international community and then draft, debate, negotiate, and vote on resolutions to address those issues. Any student interested in pursuing a career in statecraft and diplomacy would benefit from this class.
HA4065 Crisis Diplomacy
Pre Requisites: HA2026
AU: 4
This course is an applied seminar for students aspiring to careers in foreign affairs. Through a series of simulations, discussions and lectures, you will become acquainted with the practice of statecraft and diplomacy on a practical level. From the perspective of policymakers, we will tackle several of the most pressing issues in contemporary international security, ranging from traditional security issues like inter-state and civil war, nuclear proliferation, and the rise of great powers to more non-traditional, newer issues like terrorism, climate change, and “human security.”  You will explore the intricacies, challenges, and possibilities of diplomacy during international crises through an active learning approach using simulations. Any student interested in pursuing a career in statecraft and diplomacy would benefit from this class.
HA4066 War in Film
Pre Requisites: HA1001 & HA1012
AU: 4
How does film shape our understanding of war? In this course, through an examination of twentieth century film, we will study the various ways in which a number of writers and directors have approached the subject of war.
HA4071 ​Religion in Plural Societies: Violence, Peace, and Identity
Pre Requisites: Nil
AU: 4
This course explores the role of religion in society, with particular relation to conflict, violence and peacebuilding processes. It begins by introducing methods and theories in the study of religion, but with a focus on religion in social and political contexts in plural societies. In the latter part of the course, you will embark on an investigation into the relationship between religion, violence and peacebuilding. This will be based on understanding the theological and social aspects of how religion relates to diversity, including notions of identity. There will be a consideration of a range of case studies, sources and texts, while you will be guided to analyse different kinds of arguments and practices that communities, intellectuals, and activists use to promote peace and violence.
HA4099 Graduation Project
AU: 8
​The objective of HA4099 Graduation Project in Politics and Public Administration is to provide training in independent research work. With the guidance of a supervisor, each student will identify a research problem, formulate research questions, develop a theoretical framework and design a methodological approach. By the completion of the project the student will have gained experience in theoretical reasoning, empirical research (especially the collection, interpretation and analysis of data), and the writing and presentation of research findings.
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